Foundations · Growth · Mike

Power Tool Advantage

Mike is sent to do some snooping, but he’s going undercover as a repairman that’s been hired. The customer is averse to electricity and had requested that no power tools be used. Mike knows this, but needs the customer out of the area so that he can snap some pictures. He brings power tools to ensure that the customer gives him some privacy. From an economics standpoint, Mike makes a compelling case for power tools as it relates to productivity.

He could make the repairs things the old-fashioned way: “going at it like Fred Flinstone.” The tools, as Mike explains, helps turn a two-day job into a one day job. Capital investments and technology helps producers lower the cost of producing items. From a PPF standpoint, it allows the curve to shift outward and producers to be able to produce more stuff given a fixed amount of time.

See More: Better Call Saul, capital investment, efficiency, growth, production, technology

Gus · Healthcare · Jesse · Mike

Medical Incentives

Gus and Mike have both been shot. However, the personnel at temporary medical facility they found themselves in only focus on saving Gus. Jesse is frustrated by this because Mike and he are very close. Nevertheless, the doctor points out that Gus is the priority because he is the one paying his salary. This is also visible in our current medical system. Specifically, those who have the ability to pay often receive priority and extra-quality healthcare, which may not be equitable, but may be, perhaps, efficient.

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Costs & Production · Jesse · Mike · Walter

Production Alternatives

After running out of their primary ingredient, Mike suggests that they go back to producing using pseudoephedrine. Walter quickly points on that their equipment isn’t designed for this and it will reduce their yield significantly. Mike argues that the alternative is not making anything at all and that making some product is better than making no product at all. This scene serves as a nice example of why firms may operate at a loss rather than shut down. As long as the price of the product is greater than average variable costs, firms will operate in the short run.

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Jesse · Market Structures · Mike · Supply and Demand · Walter

Hire the Cook

After a failed first attempt to gain full control over a key production input and get the blue methamphetamine off the market, Declan, a Phoenix-based dealer, meets with Jesse, Mike, and Walter. Right from the start, Walter tries and appears to succeed in convincing Declan that collaboration is the best path forward. This way, Walter’s superior blue methamphetamine remains in production and the methylamine, the key input, is used in the most efficient and profitable way. Further, Declan and his crew would serve as their distributor. This way the parties specialize according to their comparative advantage while all parties economize and gain from trade.

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Costs & Production · Gus · Walter

Walt’s New Facility

After joining forces with Gus Fring, Walter learns about his new lab. The production facility is state of the art and includes some of the best equipment available on the market. This new equipment will allow Walt to produce even more of his blue meth than he could have previously imagined. Economies of scale are important in the production process. As facilities grow, their organization can begin producing large quantities, which lowers the average cost of production.

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